Connect with us

Gossips

Doctor Strange and Wanda Team Up in First ‘Multiverse of Madness’ Trailer

Published

on

doctor strange

After footage was first shown as ...-credits scene of “Spider-Man: No Way Home,” the official trailer for “Doctor Strange in the Multiverse of Madness” is here.

The next adventure in the Marvel Cinematic Universe sees Doctor Strange and Wanda Maximoff team up as monsters and villains from the multiverse spill over into our world. After the events of “No Way Home,” “Loki” and “WandaVision,” the structural integrity of the multiverse has taken a beating. That could be why an evil, alternate version of Doctor Strange, who originally appeared in the animated Disney Plus series “What If…?,” has crossed over to wreak havoc in the main MCU timeline. A tentacled monster with one giant eye, based on the comic-book villains Shuma-Gorath and Gargantos, also causes some trouble for the heroes.

In addition to Benedict Cumberbatch and Elizabeth Olsen reprising their roles as Doctor Strange and Wanda, other returning stars include Benedict Wong as Wong, Rachel McAdams as Dr. Christine Palmer and Chiwetel Ejiofor as Karl Mordo. Xochitl Gomez will debut as the young hero America Chavez, who has the power to punch holes into different realities, which will surely come in handy.

Advertisement

Sam Raimi took over from original “Doctor Strange” director Scott Derrickson, who stepped down from the film due to creative differences. Raimi is already known in the superhero world for directing the Tobey Maguire “Spider-Man” trilogy for Sony in the 2000s. “Loki” writer Michael Waldron and Jade Halley Bartlett wrote the script.

After being delayed a full year, “Doctor Strange in the Multiverse of Madness” is coming to theaters on May 6, 2022. Watch the trailer below.

 

Advertisement

Gossips

Ian Alexander Jr., Musician and Son of Regina King, Dies by Suicide at 26

Published

on

ian alexander jr

Ian Alexander Jr., a musician, DJ and son of actress and director Regina King, has died by suicide. He was 26 years old.

Alexander’s death was confirmed to Variety by a public relations representative for King. No further details are available at this time.

“Our family is devastated at the deepest level by the loss of Ian,” King said in a statement. “He is such a bright light who cared so deeply about the happiness of others. Our family asks for respectful consideration during this private time. Thank you.”

Advertisement

Alexander was born on Jan. 19, 1996. He was King’s only child. She shared him with her ex-husband, record producer Ian Alexander Sr. The pair divorced in 2007 after ten years of marriage.

Alexander was a practicing musician and DJ. Performing under the name Desduné, Alexander had been preparing to perform several shows in Los Angeles later this month. His most recent single, “Green Eyes,” was released on Jan. 7. King shared the track on her Instagram last week, showing support for her son.

Alexander was often seen accompanying his mother at red carpet events, including the LACMA Art+ Film Gala and various awards shows. Most recently, he had appeared alongside King to help commemorate his mother’s achievements in entertainment at her Hollywood Walk of Fame ceremony in October 2021.

“She’s just a super mom,” Alexander told E! News in a red carpet interview alongside King at the Golden Globe Awards in 2019. “She doesn’t really let bad work days or anything come back and ruin the time that we have. It’s really awesome to have a mother who I can enjoy spending time with.”

Advertisement

Continue Reading

Gossips

‘Plaza Catedral,’ ‘Prayers for the Stolen’ Deal With Violence Inflicted Upon Youth in Latin America

Published

on

Prayers for the Stolen Top 10

Mexico’s Tatiana Huezo and Abner Benaim of Panama, whose respective dramas, “Prayers for the Stolen” and “Plaza Catedral,” made the coveted shortlist in the Oscars’ international feature category, have quite a few things in common. Both have mainly worked in documentary filmmaking, although in the case of Benaim, he made a hit comedy in 2009, “Chance,” before focusing on nonfiction films.

Neither are strangers to the Oscar experience. Benaim has represented Panama twice. With its first submission to the Oscars in 2014, an account of the 1989 U.S. invasion of Panama, “Invasion,” and in 2018 with “Ruben Blades Is Not My Name,” which gets up close and personal with the actor, multi-Grammy winner and activist who also served as minister of tourism and ran for president of Panama.

“Prayers for the Stolen” is Huezo’s first narrative feature and her second turn at representing Mexico, the first time was with her documentary “Tempestad” in 2017.

Advertisement

Both “Prayers” and “Plaza Catedral” deal with the violence inflicted on the young, which for Benaim hit closer to home when his non-pro teenage lead, Fernando Xavier de Casta, was gunned down a few months before the pic’s release. He dedicates “Plaza Catedral” to him and to the many “children and teenagers who die every day in Latin America, victims of senseless violence.”

A coming-of-age fable, “Prayers for the Stolen” follows three young girls, also played by non-pros, in a remote village where the danger of being abducted by drug cartels is ever-present.

Asked why she thinks her film has resonated with viewers, Huezo muses: “I’d like to believe that it’s because the film draws you into the girls’ tiny universes and also brings home the impact of violence on families’ lives, almost like a punch to the gut. But it also connects through the beauty, tenderness and purity of their innocent lives.”

“Plaza Catedral” revolves around Alicia (played by Ilse Salas) who, having lost her 6-year-old son in a freak accident, remains grief-stricken and withdrawn. She ignores the scrappy street kid played by Xavier de Casta, who demands to be paid for watching her car in the titular Plaza Catedral. One day, she is shocked out of her self-imposed isolation when he shows up at her doorstep, bleeding from a gunshot wound. Samuel Goldywn Films has picked up U.S. rights.

Advertisement

“It’s always a mystery when a film resonates with people,” Benaim says. “But I think ‘Plaza Catedral’ affects people in two waves — first they are moved by the story and the performances and then a second wave of emotion comes over them when they realize that reality has caught up with the story.

“The reality of what happened to Fernando does not allow us the luxury to think that it was just a film.”

Both dramas reflect their documentary filmmaking roots. As Variety critic Jessica Kiang observed: “Benaim brings some of his documentarian sensibility to bear on a story that might otherwise feel a little schematic.”

“I think that having worked so much on documentaries makes me less afraid of the uncertainty and lack of control that is sometimes associated with non-actors — I actually see it the other way around … I enjoy the freshness and unpredictable as welcome surprises,” he says. “One can detect when things feel real and when they don’t — and that alertness for what feels fake is something I keep turned on while making a documentary or fiction film.”

Advertisement

Huezo concurs: “As a documentary filmmaker, you become very astute and empathetic; you develop an instinct for recognizing the real moments of truth, the true emotions in facial expressions, in the glances exchanged and in the movements of the actors.”

Continue Reading