Connect with us

Relationship

Meet The Female Entrepreneur Who Is Taking The World By Storm One Manicure At A Time

Published

on

beauty

“Give a woman the right manicure, and she can change the world.” 

These are the words that Lauren Berkovitz, founder and CEO of Lauren B. Beauty, lives by. Since she was a little girl offering manicures in the make-shift salon she created in her garage, Berkovitz has felt empowered to conquer the world with perfectly painted nails. This attitude inspired her to follow her dreams and launch her own nail polish business, Lauren B. Beauty, at the end of 2013. 

By the time Lauren had grown into a young woman, she had noticed a gap in the beauty market for better quality nail products that aren’t harmful yet still fit her lengthy list of demands. So she spent six years perfecting a nail polish formula that is cruelty-free, vegan, long-lasting, and chip-resistant.

Advertisement
269750148 1379411455843338 3053564339741656922 n
via author

Before my conversation with Lauren Berkovitz, she generously sent me samples of her products. 

This included four of her stunning colors, all based on the city of Los Angeles, nail polish remover, topcoat, and nail growth serum. At the time of writing, I’ve gotten to test out the Beach House Vibes polish and the Polynesian Plumeria polish. I can testify that Lauren B. Beauty’s products are as good, if not better, as the website claims. The colors were beautiful and didn’t chip for a full two weeks, even while I was living a more hectic than normal life traveling for the holidays. 

Lauren Berkovitz
via author

Although the products offered by Lauren B. Beauty are impressive in their own right, I couldn’t help but be inspired by Berkovitz’s story. It’s a story of female empowerment as she navigated the business world as a female entrepreneur and now as a new mother. I was lucky enough that she was willing to sit down with me to talk about her experience running her own business. She also shared the advice she has for the next generation of female entrepreneurs. For young women like me, Berkovitz’s story shows that you can be successful pursuing your passions and that hard work really does pay off.

Lauren Berkovitz
via author

CK: What challenges have you overcome as a female entrepreneur, and how did you do it?

LB: I never imagined that the beauty industry would have so many males in charge. When I started, I was young. I was constantly judged for being a young girl or was mistaken for being an admin in the boardroom. I had to constantly prove myself and fight to get to where I am today. There are many hurdles from pitching nail care to men, to raising funds and being asked inappropriate questions. 

CK: How do you manage your role within your company and your other daily life responsibilities? 

LB: Since we’re a smaller company, I wear many hats. But without my amazing team, I would not be able to do what I do. We all give 110% and do whatever it takes to get the job done. I’m constantly challenged with balancing my work, home, and family with my job, but that’s okay. I am learning. But relying on others in all aspects and surrounding myself with a good tribe of supportive people is absolutely essential. I don’t think you can have it all at the same time, but I do think there is a balancing act. Sometimes home life will require more attention, and sometimes work will. But it all ebbs and flows. 

CK: What new challenges has becoming a new mom created for your role at Lauren B. Beauty? 

LB: I am still learning how to juggle, delegate more, and outsource tasks both at home and at work. I think being flexible and adjusting has been a big lesson. 

It’s also important for my son to see that I work hard. Sometimes he has to come with me to the office after work hours to get something done. That is okay because I am showing him that I work hard and do whatever it takes. 

CK: What advice do you wish you could go back and tell yourself when you were first launching Lauren B. Beauty? 

LB: Just go for it. Take the risk, don’t overthink it, and spend less time worrying about every detail. I shed so many tears and worried about specific things that seemed major. Looking back, they weren’t that important, and we got through them. Also, remember that failure is okay but don’t dwell on it either. Just learn and move forward. 

Advertisement

CK: What would you tell another young woman who is considering launching her own business?

LB: Life is short, so LOVE what you do, and be the best at it. Take the time to know the ins and outs of your industry or product. Starting your own business is hard, so surround yourself with the right support system. Don’t be afraid to network and ask for help. Also, take care and love yourself first, so you can be the leader your company needs. 

CK: What’s coming next for your brand? 

LB: We launch new colors twice a year, so we will constantly have something new to offer. I am currently working on an exciting custom project for a large department store. We plan to launch in February, so stay tuned for that. I am also passionate about hand care, so you can be on the lookout for more science-driven products to address the aging hand. 

To see more from Lauren Berkovitz and shop Lauren B. Beauty products, check out her website, Instagram, and Facebook! 

*Some answers have been edited for length and clarity*

Advertisement

Featured image via Lauren Berkovitz

/* large monitors */ var adEl = document.createElement("ins"); placeAdEl.replaceWith(adEl); adEl.setAttribute("class", "adsbygoogle"); adEl.setAttribute("style", "display:inline-block;width:468px;height:60px"); adEl.setAttribute("data-ad-client", "ca-pub-8156577949690148"); adEl.setAttribute("data-ad-slot", "5140702518");

} });window.addEventListener("load", function(){ var placeAdEl = document.getElementById("td-ad-placeholder"); if ( null !== placeAdEl && td_screen_width >= 1019 && td_screen_width < 1140 ) { /* landscape tablets */ var adEl = document.createElement("ins"); placeAdEl.replaceWith(adEl); adEl.setAttribute("class", "adsbygoogle"); adEl.setAttribute("style", "display:inline-block;width:468px;height:60px"); adEl.setAttribute("data-ad-client", "ca-pub-8156577949690148"); adEl.setAttribute("data-ad-slot", "5140702518"); } });window.addEventListener("load", function(){ var placeAdEl = document.getElementById("td-ad-placeholder"); if ( null !== placeAdEl && td_screen_width >= 768 && td_screen_width < 1019 ) { /* portrait tablets */ var adEl = document.createElement("ins"); placeAdEl.replaceWith(adEl); adEl.setAttribute("class", "adsbygoogle"); adEl.setAttribute("style", "display:inline-block;width:468px;height:60px"); adEl.setAttribute("data-ad-client", "ca-pub-8156577949690148"); adEl.setAttribute("data-ad-slot", "5140702518"); } });window.addEventListener("load", function(){ var placeAdEl = document.getElementById("td-ad-placeholder"); if ( null !== placeAdEl && td_screen_width < 768 ) { /* Phones */ var adEl = document.createElement("ins"); placeAdEl.replaceWith(adEl); adEl.setAttribute("class", "adsbygoogle"); adEl.setAttribute("style", "display:inline-block;width:300px;height:250px"); adEl.setAttribute("data-ad-client", "ca-pub-8156577949690148"); adEl.setAttribute("data-ad-slot", "5140702518"); } });

Advertisement

Relationship

The ‘Bad Habit’ That Could Be Sabotaging Your Relationship Right Now

Published

on

procrastination

Falling in love with someone you’ve been dating is typically a beautiful, romantic experience, but when depression, low self-esteem, and other mental health issues crop up and cause you to turn to the negative coping mechanism that is the bad habit of procrastination, it can raise problems in a relationship you otherwise might not encounter. Procrastination is the gap between intention and action, which is why people who procrastinate sometimes have trouble finding love or end up self-sabotaging their relationships.

The word procrastination comes from “pro” meaning forward and “cras” meaning tomorrow. Procrastination, therefore, means to put off until tomorrow. It is the act of carrying out less urgent tasks in preference for more urgent ones or doing more pleasurable things in place of less pleasurable ones.

Advertisement

Procrastination voluntarily delays an intended course of action despite expecting to be worse off for the delay. And, no, procrastination is not a problem of time management or planning. It is a force that prevents you from following through on what you set out to do, which can lead to self-sabotaging relationships.

In a nutshell, procrastination:

  • Is irrational.
  • Drives you to act against your own judgment.
  • Is counterproductive.
  • Is devastating to personal and business lives.

Twenty percent of people identify themselves as chronic procrastinators.

Are you one of them?

Research shows that we regret those things we have not done more than we do the things we have done. Procrastination blocks you from living life to its fullest. The main reason why we procrastinate is that taking action will cause us a certain amount of pain and discomfort. We avoid undertaking certain tasks because of the risk of shame, vulnerability, and failure. Taking action means that we might be making a mistake or we might fail. We do not want to take action and look anything less than perfect. We, therefore, choose to avoid taking action and instinctively retreat to our comfort zone.

Unfortunately, we will never make progress unless we take action. In trying to protect ourselves from failure, we often erect our own barriers to success. Psychologists refer to this as self-handicapping, which is the strategy of intentionally sabotaging our own efforts and research shows that by creating impediments that make success less likely, we nicely protect our sense of self-competence.

Advertisement

Paradoxically, we are more likely to self-handicap when the stakes are highest. The more important a task is, the more a procrastinator needs to protect himself by not trying too hard. Procrastination appeals to some of us as a way of controlling our lives in some small way; a life that can become chaotic and unmanageable. In this way, procrastination is a coping mechanism, as by remaining in our comfort zone, we avoid negative consequences that may come with taking action.

Unfortunately, procrastination is a form of self-deception and one that only adds to the chaos.

via GIPHY

Whatever your comfort zone is, you pay a hefty price for staying inside it. Your comfort zone is a shrunken world where opportunities, ideas, and wonderful relationships can easily pass you by. When you procrastinate, you pass the buck to your future self. So how does this affect our relationships?

Advertisement

Healthy relationships are built on teamwork.

When you sign on to become someone’s partner, you become one part of the partnership. When one member of the team keeps missing their goals, the entire team loses, hurting your relationship. If you fail to contribute your 50 percent, you are not holding up your end of the bargain. If you are a procrastinator, you are therefore sabotaging your relationship. Some relationship counselors refer to procrastination as “a slow-burning relationship issue,” acting like a python slowly squeezing the life out of your love.

Here are the 4 ways procrastination is destroying relationships:

1. It can stress you out.

A procrastinator is often a kind and caring person who wants to make their partner happy. They are more relaxed and thrive in non-demanding environments. Procrastinators will do marginally useful things as they avoid undertaking tasks that they may feel are difficult or time-consuming. As a result, the partner might feel unimportant, un-cared for, and ignored.

Consequently, resentment, lack of trust, and a downward spiral may begin, eventually further damaging your self-esteem, self-confidence, and motivation. You may even become discouraged and stop trying out of fear that any action you take will be too late or insufficient.

Advertisement

2. You risk losing your partner’s trust.

via GIPHY

One day, your words and promises might come to mean nothing to your partner. When your partner expects you to do something and you to put off the task for another day at another time, the result is that you become perceived as not being dependable.

Relationships thrive when promises are kept, agreements are honored, and commitments are met.

Advertisement

Procrastination leads to wasted time, endless delays in completing the task at hand, and many missed opportunities. In relationships, the undone tasks can become a symbol of the partner’s unmet needs, as well as a measure of disrespect, and lack of caring for the procrastinator.

All these things not only hinder the progress of your relationship but also make your partner feel as if they cannot rely on you. Your partner may slowly start undertaking more tasks on their own and relegate you more and more to the sidelines. This can result in you feeling useless. We all want to be needed, so being seen as unreliable can cause further damage to your self-esteem.

3. It can delay improvement in your relationship.

Many unhappy couples spend needless months lamenting the state of their relationships while making no strategic or proactive effort to remediate the situation. If you are a procrastinator, even though you are clear about your unhappiness, you may even procrastinate initiating the conversations to heal your relationship.

Initiating the necessary conversation is understandably difficult and scary. However, your relationship will only grow when you overcome harmful and self-defeating behaviors. Not acting may bring temporary peace, but it only compounds future discomfort.

Advertisement

Initiating conversations about the weakness in certain aspects of your relationship is a challenging task that evokes fear and uncertainty about the outcome of the discussion. You may find it easier to resort to silence and hope that the relationship will just improve on its own. But guess what? This will never happen! Procrastinating is trading the discomfort of the moment for a more prolonged, more chronic unhappiness.

4. Procrastination affects your feelings of self-worth.

via GIPHY

Procrastination could potentially lower your self-esteem and cause an increase in depression, affecting how you deal with others, especially those closest to you. The doubts that may creep up about your competency may potentially drive you further away from your partner as you attempt to hide your fear of failure from their view. Your partner needs your loving presence in the relationship. This requires your attention and commitment to honoring your agreements.

Advertisement

Strengthening a relationship means investing your time in it. If you have no time to invest, it will be impossible to hold on for long.

Originally written by Christopher D. Brown on YourTango

Featured image via Ketut Subiyanto on Pexels

Advertisement


Advertisement
Continue Reading

Relationship

I Was Misdiagnosed For 12 Years Before Hearing About A Rare Genetic Condition

Published

on

adrian rosco stef EO1 9Z2yPQQ unsplash

Starting in 2010, I began collecting diagnoses like candy. After recovering from leg surgery (due to an overuse injury from excessive ski training), I started involuntarily vomiting everything I ate or drank… and it hasn’t stopped since. 

At the time, I was a cross-country skier attempting to make the 2014 Olympics. 

I was one of the fastest junior skiers in the country. My coaches were two men in their 70’s who had been best friends since they were young. They had a long history of coaching the U.S. and Canadian ski teams. I respected these two men and deeply loved them for investing in me and believing in my dream.

Advertisement

After racing in Germany at age 19, and having a terrible overuse injury flare in both legs, I chose to push on and go race in Switzerland with the team. However, my body had other plans. One night, I was doing push ups in the cabin we were renting, and all of a sudden my rib cracked and I fell on my face, screaming in pain. So I flew home and had lower leg surgery, and rested my broken rib.

After that, I became sicker and sicker, and watched my Olympic dream crumble, my hopes of having kids tarnished, and my desire for feeling better battered. I have acquired so many misdiagnoses because nobody could explain my symptoms, even remotely, from what my imaging, tests and studies showed. 

For twelve and a half years I went from one doctor to the next, exhausting all their options, and then being written off as a psychiatric case. 

I’ve been to treatment centers thirteen times for a severe eating disorder that I do not deny is real, but that started as a result of not being able to keep my food down, as well as a result of childhood trauma. 

When I sought medical help for the vomiting, I was diagnosed with mild idiopathic gastroparesis and colonic inertia. I was prescribed laxatives and a motility aid. Neither of those worked, and I remained constipated, in abdominal agony from cramping, vomiting, and having bowel blowouts from how many laxatives I had to take to relieve my bowels. 

Advertisement

Next the vomiting was called Rumination Syndrome and I was instructed to breathe differently while I was “regurgitating.” However, I wasn’t regurgitating, as the vomit was projectile at times and I was unable to hold it in my mouth. In treatment centers, I was instructed to swallow the vomit down.

When nothing was working to stop my vomiting and rapid weight loss, a gastroenterologist at the Mayo Clinic suggested I get an ileostomy to relieve the intense abdominal pain from a colon that wasn’t working. I had surgery in 2017, and with minimal complications, I’ve lived in so much less pain since. But unfortunately, it didn’t affect the vomiting.

In 2019, I was diagnosed with Cyclical Vomiting Syndrome and told to fill out a chart detailing emotions, feelings, and situations before, during, and after an episode. 

I was shut in a room alone for three weeks while I supposedly “unlearned” vomiting. 

I was forced to clean my own vomit off the floor while still actively dry heaving, because it was supposed to teach me to stop vomiting willfully. But it didn’t.

Advertisement

In 2019, I had surgery for a Jejunostomy feeding tube that goes into my small intestines, and I was tube fed, but struggled with pain and cramping. I also couldn’t get the volume up to a decent calorie amount because my intestines would be in so much pain, and I would start vomiting bile. I could vomit up to 30 times per day. It was absurd. 

In 2020, I was inpatient in Colorado, and I met another patient who was from Boston. I immediately thought she was cool, and we started getting to know each other. 

She told me she had a genetic condition called Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome that makes your collagen defective. 

She pointed out a bunch of little things in my body that were typical in someone with the condition. I was curious enough to ask her for her geneticist’s name because I live in Maine, and Boston is within driving distance. I called the office, thinking I’d be on a waitlist for years, and they got me in to see the doctor in just three weeks. 

After I was discharged from the program for failing to meet their criteria, I met with the geneticist. He diagnosed me with hypermobile type Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome. I had a bunch of comorbidities, such as POTS (Postural Orthostatic Tachycardia Syndrome), MCAS (Mast Cell Activation Syndrome), CFS/ME (Chronic Fatigue Syndrome), an autoimmune disease (Hashimoto’s), Colonic Inertia, and moderate Gastroparesis. 

Advertisement

Suddenly the pieces of my confusing health history started making sense. 

I was directed to a gastroenterologist who helped me feel more comfortable by switching me to a G/J tube (which was a little surgery for a lot of relief). It allowed me to drain bile and acid from my stomach and feed through my intestines. However, my intestines stopped absorbing the tube feed and I lost a bunch of weight and became emaciated yet again. 

A year ago, I was switched to TPN through a PICC line in my upper arm(s) – I had multiple, and now a Hickman Central line in my chest feeds me. I had another Jejunostomy surgery when I continuously threw up my G/J tube, because I still need the tube for medications. 

At that time, we switched my G/J tube to a straight G so I could drain more volume faster. I wear a urine self catheter bag around my leg that attaches to my G tube for draining anything in my stomach. My J tube is just for medications, but without it I end up hospitalized. 

I finally feel heard, seen, valued, and considered. 

I’m not simply dismissed as the “chronically ill” (rolls eyes) and mentally unstable patient who ends up in the ER every few weeks for some random issue, like throwing up a feeding tube, or fainting and hitting my head. Nobody is sending me to another treatment center or locking me in an institution, despite that possibly being a good idea, if I think about it…

Advertisement

Patients with Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome (EDS) often are misdiagnosed multiple times before figuring out they have EDS. 

EDS patients are repeatedly treated as if our pain and symptoms are all in our head. 

We are often dismissed because the doctors simply don’t know, but to save face, they blame us for somehow causing the issue. 

If there is one thing I want people with undiagnosed EDS to know, it’s that you know your body best… That’s it. Trust in your experience.

Photo by Adrian “Rosco” Stef on Unsplash

Advertisement

} });window.addEventListener("load", function(){ var placeAdEl = document.getElementById("td-ad-placeholder"); if ( null !== placeAdEl && td_screen_width >= 1019 && td_screen_width < 1140 ) { /* landscape tablets */ var adEl = document.createElement("ins"); placeAdEl.replaceWith(adEl); adEl.setAttribute("class", "adsbygoogle"); adEl.setAttribute("style", "display:inline-block;width:468px;height:60px"); adEl.setAttribute("data-ad-client", "ca-pub-8156577949690148"); adEl.setAttribute("data-ad-slot", "5140702518"); } });window.addEventListener("load", function(){ var placeAdEl = document.getElementById("td-ad-placeholder"); if ( null !== placeAdEl && td_screen_width >= 768 && td_screen_width < 1019 ) { /* portrait tablets */ var adEl = document.createElement("ins"); placeAdEl.replaceWith(adEl); adEl.setAttribute("class", "adsbygoogle"); adEl.setAttribute("style", "display:inline-block;width:468px;height:60px"); adEl.setAttribute("data-ad-client", "ca-pub-8156577949690148"); adEl.setAttribute("data-ad-slot", "5140702518"); } });window.addEventListener("load", function(){ var placeAdEl = document.getElementById("td-ad-placeholder"); if ( null !== placeAdEl && td_screen_width < 768 ) { /* Phones */ var adEl = document.createElement("ins"); placeAdEl.replaceWith(adEl); adEl.setAttribute("class", "adsbygoogle"); adEl.setAttribute("style", "display:inline-block;width:300px;height:250px"); adEl.setAttribute("data-ad-client", "ca-pub-8156577949690148"); adEl.setAttribute("data-ad-slot", "5140702518"); } });

Continue Reading