Connect with us

Healthy diet

The #1 Best Diet for Migraines, According to New Evidence

Published

on

migrane headache

It’s no secret: Migraines can be pretty terrible. Though you may start to feel helpless when the pain hits, there are certain actions you can take to help manage your symptoms. For instance, certain fruits could spike your risk of migraine, while foods high in omega-3 fatty acids may decrease the frequency and intensity of these severe headaches.

Now, a case study of a 60-year-old man who suffered from chronic migraines for more than 12 years suggests that eating the plant-based, whole foods diet known as the LIFE (Low Inflammatory Foods Everyday) diet could play a key role in fighting chronic migraines.

The study, which was published in the journal BMJ Case Reports, revealed that after sticking to the diet, which is rich in nutrient-dense leafy greens among other plant-based whole foods, for two months, the patient went from experiencing headaches 18 to 24 days a month to one. The headaches disappeared after three months, and the migraines haven’t recurred in more than seven years.

Advertisement

RELATED: The 100 Unhealthiest Foods On the Planet

“Using the LIFE diet . . . succeeded in reversing chronic migraines when other interventions had failed,” study author David M. Dunaief, MD, said. “While the results are impressive, this is not a large prospective trial. Still, there is no downside to following the LIFE diet with medical oversight, since the side effects are better health.”

For his part, the patient commented that, in addition to eliminating the painful headaches, the diet allowed him to shake his reliance on medications with heavy side effects and improved his asthma as an added bonus.

Still, while eating a plant-based whole foods diet has plenty of benefits for your health, a single case study is far from enough evidence to guarantee that switching to this diet would make your chronic migraines go away.

Advertisement

RELATED: To get all of the latest news delivered straight to your email inbox every day, don’t forget to sign up for our newsletter!

“This is a case study of one person, and results vary greatly from one migraine sufferer to the next. I’ve had some patients who had migraines resolve from being on an anti-inflammatory elimination diet and others who felt little to no improvement,” Michelle Babb, MS, RD, author of Mastering Mindful Eating, told Eat This, Not That! in an interview. “There’s no downside to trying an anti-inflammatory diet and/or an elimination diet, but if the migraines are hormonally induced or the result of changes in barometric pressure, there may not be notable improvement from the LIFE diet alone.”

Stating that the LIFE diet did not significantly reduce the patient’s inflammation, Babb added that the study left her with “a lot of questions.” However, Babb agreed that there are “a lot of reasons” to try an anti-inflammatory diet. Reducing inflammation can help keep you sharp, maintain your heart health, stave off arthritis, and even combat fatigue.

For more on fighting inflammation, be sure to learn about How to Lower Inflammation Starting Right Now, According to Nutritionists.

Advertisement

Healthy diet

Surefire Ways to Protect Your Gut, Say Dietitians

Published

on

Gut health has become an increasingly hot topic in recent years—and with good reason. Over the last few decades, emerging research has discovered links between gut health and the immune system, mood and mental health, and has suggested it may play a role in autoimmune diseases, skin conditions, and even cancer. In other words, you might be able to prevent—and resolve—a number of physical and mental issues by simply taking care of your microbiome.

According to Katie Krejci, MS, RD, LD, IFNCP, 70% of your body’s lymphocytes—white blood cells that play a key role in immune function—are in your gut. Not only that, but 75% of the feel-good neurotransmitters—like serotonin and dopamine—are also produced there.

“While the science of the microbiome is still in its infancy, studies suggest that it is one of the most important regulators of overall health with a potential effect on digestion, weight, skin, allergies, hormones, and more,” says Mia Syn, RD, MS.

Advertisement

What you eat has a significant impact on gut health. While certain foods can help support a healthy, balanced microbiome, others can promote an imbalance that has been linked to gastrointestinal conditions such as irritable bowel syndrome, as well as other chronic conditions and diseases like obesity, asthma, colitis, type 2 diabetes, and cardiovascular disease.

With all that in mind, experts strongly advise heeding the following tips for protecting your gut. Then, be sure to read The #1 Best Juice to Drink Every Day, Says Science.

fruit and vegetables
Shutterstock

Next time you go grocery shopping, make it a point to fill your cart with a range of veggies, fruits, whole grains, beans, legumes, nuts, and seeds. According to Cassie Madsen, Ms, RD, The American Gut Project has found that those who eat 30 or more plant foods per week have more diversity of gut bacteria than those who eat fewer than 10 plants per week. But that’s not all.

“Plants are high in fiber,” says Amy Adams, RD, LDN. “Fiber feeds our gut and increases our good microbes. If the microbes are fed well, they will multiply, which strengthens our gut health. When fiber is fermented, it produces short-chain fatty acids, which help to thicken the mucus walls in our gastrointestinal tract, creating a barrier and halting bad bacteria from migrating. And different plants provide different nutrients, prebiotics, and polyphenols, which leads to a more diverse gut.”

eating yogurt jar
Shutterstock

“Consuming probiotics is one of the best things you can do to re-balance your gut,” says Krejci. “Probiotics have potent antimicrobial activity, they improve how the intestinal wall’s function and they have a positive impact on the gut immune cells.”

Krejci’s favorite way to get probiotics is through a variety of foods rich in this friendly bacteria, such as yogurt, kefir, kombucha, kimchi, and fermented vegetables. She advises consuming these several times per day and from a variety of sources for maximum benefits. But if you aren’t getting enough probiotics through your diet alone, Syn recommends seeking out a high-quality probiotic supplement, like TruBiotics.

“I like this one because it’s comprised of the two most clinically studied types of good bacteria—Bifidobacterium and lactobacillus,” she explains. “Additionally, the strains used have one of the best survivability rates in the gastrointestinal track among all probiotic strains.”

In addition to probiotics, experts say you should prioritize prebiotics as well. These indigestible fibers feed the good bacteria in your gut so they can flourish.

Advertisement

“The microbiome ferments the prebiotics into short-chain fatty acids,” says Krejci. “Short-chain fatty acids have potent anti-inflammatory effects and strengthen the intestinal barrier to keep pathogens from getting into the bloodstream.”

According to Krejci and Syn, the best food sources of prebiotics are artichokes, green bananas, avocado, garlic, onions, leeks, and root vegetables.

RELATED: No, Probiotics and Prebiotics Aren’t the Same Thing

baked potato chips
Shutterstock

Adams points out that ultra-processed foods like cereals with added sugar, cookies, and chips usually contain little to no fiber—especially when made with refined flours rather than whole grains.

“Fiber helps to bulk up our stool and relieve constipation,” she continues. “Having regular bowel movements reduces the time that waste hangs around in your colon. Chronically constipated individuals are found to have higher levels of methane-producing bacteria in their intestines. Methane not only slows down your gastrointestinal tract even more, but it can also migrate from the colon to the small intestine, and cause a condition known as small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO), which, in severe cases can lead to malabsorption and micronutrient deficiencies.”

Advertisement

In case you needed further incentive to ditch the packaged, preservative-laden snacks—a 2021 study published in the journal Gut found that people who consumed a diet high in processed foods, fast food, and sugar had greater levels of destructive bacteria that produce toxins harmful to the gut.

red wine in a glass next to bottle
Shutterstock

Experts advise thinking twice before pouring that second glass of wine—the more alcohol you drink, the more damage you’re likely doing to your gut.

“Research suggests that chronic alcohol consumption can induce gut inflammation and negatively alter intestinal microbiota composition and function,” says Syn.

Susan Kelly, RDN with Pacific Analytics, adds that the consistent gut inflammation caused by alcohol can also lead to heartburn, bacterial infections, and even ulcers.

artificial sweetener coffee
Shutterstock

Particularly if you’re trying to lose weight, it may be tempting to opt for artificial sweeteners—but before you do so, consider this: a slew of studies have shown that these zero-calorie alternatives can wreak some major havoc on your gut. Specifically, a 2019 review published in the journal Advanced Nutrition revealed that sucralose and stevia can negatively impact bacteria in the gut.

In fact, some research has suggested that consuming artificial sweeteners can lead to glucose intolerance. What’s worse, a 2021 study in the International Journal of Molecular Sciences found artificial sweeteners can make normal and healthy gut bacteria become pathogenic.

Advertisement

“These sweeteners create an imbalance in your microbiome, which increases the risk of metabolic diseases—including diabetes and heart disease,” says Kelly.

Continue Reading

Healthy diet

11 Secrets Oatmeal Companies Don't Want You to Know

Published

on

Oatmeal is properly recognized as a healthy food. It boasts many admirable nutritional qualities, such as being rich in needed vitamins and minerals including vitamins B1 and B5, manganese, copper, iron, and more, according to HealthLine. It’s rich in protein and fiber and low in fat. It’s nutrient-dense for its per-serving calorie count. Oatmeal is delicious, too, especially when it’s paired with fresh fruit, nuts, yogurt, and other healthy additions.

The problem with oatmeal is that often the stuff you buy is laden with not-so-healthy additions, primarily sweeteners. In order to ensure all those health benefits just mentioned are not offset by unwanted ingredients, you have to be discerning and selective when it comes to the oatmeal you eat. And even then it’s actually not a good idea for most people to eat oatmeal every day.

Here are 11 secrets oatmeal companies would rather you not know about these globally-popular hulled grains. Plus, don’t miss these 22 Meals to Melt Belly Fat in 2022.

Advertisement

quaker maple brown sugar instant oatmeal

Most mainstream brands of flavored instant oatmeal, such as those from the heavy-hitter in the category, Quaker Oats, are so sugary they just shouldn’t be eaten. You’ll often find between 10 and 12 grams of sugar per a serving size well under 200 calories. This means you’ll be eating nearly a quarter of the total sugars experts recommend in a portion that provides less than a 10th of your average daily needed calories.

Your best bet is to make unflavored oatmeal and to add your own fresh fruit and light sweetener of choice.

Advertisement
Young woman suffers, writhes in abdominal pain lying on couch in living room at home interior
Shutterstock

Starches, glucose, and fiber, all of which are naturally occurring in oats (and some of which may be in even higher concentrations in more highly processed oatmeals) are all on the menu for gut bacteria. And when the bacteria in your system consumes these substances, one byproduct can be gas that leaves you in discomfort or outright pain, and can make your body look and feel swollen.

Oats

Oatmeal might seem like the ultimate shelf-stable food, and provided you store it properly, it can remain safe and tasty for a number of years. But according to My Recipes, store-bought oatmeal can and will turn rancid, and often in a matter of a year, if you leave it in its original packaging. That’s because oatmeal is often packed in paper baggies and/or cardboard packaging, both of which allow humidity, bacteria, and yeast to denigrate the quality of the food.

RELATED: 51 Healthy Overnight Oats Recipes for Weight Loss

batch cook steel cut oats
Shutterstock

You know how foods that are technically free of a given ingredient often still list that they were processed in a facility that may have caused exposure to said food? Often that’s just an abundance of caution for legal protection, but in the case of oatmeal and gluten, the issue is often real. According to HealthLine: “Oats are often contaminated with gluten because they may be processed in the same facilities as gluten-containing grains like wheat, rye, and barley.”

oatmeal
Shutterstock

To be clear, a high-quality, low-sugar oatmeal eaten in proper portion sizes is a perfectly fine occasional food choice for someone with diabetes. However, even a low-sugar oatmeal can cause a blood sugar spike if too large a portion is eaten, according to HealthLine. And because oatmeal can cause slow stomach emptying, it can affect the timing and way in which other nutrients are absorbed, which can also be an issue for diabetics.

RELATED: The Worst Drinking Habits if You Have Diabetes, Say Dietitians

steel cut oats rolled oats groats
Shutterstock

There are three common types of oatmeal you’ll find for sale: steel-cut oats, rolled oats, and quick/instant oats. All of these types of oats have the inedible hull removed and all have health benefits to a varying degree, but they are not created equal. Steel-cut oats are the least processed thus take the longest time to cook yet have the most nutritional value. Quick oats are steamed, crushed, and toasted, so they cook fast but have less fiber and rank higher on the glycemic index. Rolled oats are in the middle ground in terms of processing and health.

RELATED: Are Rolled Oats Just as Healthy as Steel Cut?

Advertisement
woman eating a bowl of oatmeal
Shutterstock

You might think of a food that keeps you full for a long time as a good thing, but there can be too much of a good thing in the case of oatmeal. Because eating oatmeal can leave you without hunger for so long, your body may end up shedding muscle mass as it doesn’t have the needed nutrients to maintain muscle tissue, not to mention to grow more of it.

overnight oatmeal raspberry coconut
Shutterstock

Glyphosate is a chemical compound commonly used to kill off weeds and grasses, according to the EPA. The herbicide is used in proximity to the production of food crops like soybeans, corn, fruits, and, as you likely surmised, oats. Thus the stuff occasionally turns up in oatmeal. Choose a certified organic brand whenever you can to help avoid this compound.

RELATED: The #1 Best Oatmeal Topping for Weight Loss, Says Dietitian

quaker dinosaur eggs oatmeal

Many parents choose oatmeal as a healthy breakfast choice for their kids, and if the right brand and product is served, it can be. On the other hand, many oatmeal products are high in sugars, as noted, and they can even be high in other unwanted things, like saturated fat. One serving of Quaker Instant Oatmeal Dinosaur Eggs, for example, has 11% of the daily recommended limit for these fats, and in a food genuinely considered low fat.

weight gain
Shutterstock

According to Prevention.com, eating oatmeal can lead to weight gain in several insidious ways. First and foremost, unless you are using pre-packaged oatmeal or you are carefully measuring out a portion, you may be eating too much of the stuff and getting many more calories than you need. Second, the blandness of many types of oatmeal can cause you to add to many other ingredients–and unhealthy ones like syrup or sugar at that. And finally, as noted earlier, because oatmeal can leave you feeling too full for too long, it may throw off a regulated eating schedule, which is a surefire way to cause weight gain issues.

Read more about the best ways to eat oatmeal for good health:

Advertisement
Continue Reading