adplus-dvertising
Connect with us

Movie News

What The Cast Of Unforgiven Looks Like Today

Published

on

l intro 1650412587

“Unforgiven” is a movie full of unusual character names. Sometimes it is obvious that we are dealing with a nickname — Little Bill, English Bob, Quick Mike, Strawberry Alice — while other times it’s not as clear. The latter is especially true with some of the other prostitutes, particularly Faith and Silky. Silky definitely seems like it could go either way, especially for the time period, but it’s a memorable character name nonetheless. Portraying Silky in “Unforgiven” is the much more commonly named Beverley Elliott, even if her first name does have one more E than is typical of the name.

Elliott’s most recent role of note was in ABC’s fantasy drama “Once Upon A Time,” where she played the role of Granny in all seven seasons of the show. She also did extended stints on the shows “Kingdom Hospital” and — before “Unforgiven” — “Bordertown.” Elliott was just ramping up her movie career when she landed the role in “Unforgiven” and has been busy on the big screen since, with credits that include “Little Women” (1994), “The Santa Clause 2,” “The Sisterhood of the Traveling Pants,” and “2012.” She’s also been a mainstay of made-for-TV films, frequently of the Christmas or romantic variety, most recently showing up in the 2022 cable movie “The Wedding Fix.” 

WATCH NOW

DOWNLOAD NOW

Movie News

Halloween Movies in Order: How to Watch Chronologically and by Release Date

Published

on

Halloween Movies How to Watch Chronologically and by Release Date 1

One of the reasons John Carpenter’s Halloween became as successful as it did was because of its simplicity. The movie had a simple plot, a low budget, and big scares. As the series went on, this simplicity ballooned into a messy and unorganized slew of movies. Several of the later sequels began to retcon older entries and create all-new timelines. For newcomers to the series, the Halloween movies can get very confusing, very quickly. Continuity is ignored and cliffhangers are left unresolved in many of the sequels.

This is one of the most iconic horror franchises of all time, and new fans are born every day. This year, the supposed final entry, Halloween Ends, will be released, so now is a great time to get caught up. While watching the films in order of release date is certainly an option, viewers will notice that intertwining storylines will be at odds with each other for most of the series. Here, we have compiled a simple way to organize the films in order of storylines. As stated before, many of the later sequels ignore earlier films, so this is the best way for fans to pick and chooses how they want the series to go in their viewing.

The original movie was released in 1978, and from it spawned the slasher genre. As the ’80s went on, it was clear that a new film released in the heart of the slasher boom was a smart idea. This led to Halloween II and the beginning of what we will refer to as the original timeline. This timeline follows Laurie Strode as she deals with the horrors of Michael Myers and how he impacted her life. This timeline ignores most of the movies released in the ’80s and ’90s and contains the following movies:

This is where it all started. Halloween follows a small Illinois town as it is terrorized by an escaped mental patient. A six-year-old boy named Michael Myers murdered his sister in cold blood on Halloween night, 1963. 15 years later, Michael escapes and returns to his hometown of Haddonfield to claim more lives. His psychiatrist, Dr. Loomis (Donald Pleasance), is in hot pursuit. Loomis desperately tries to warn the local police station, but by the time they take him seriously, Michael has already chosen his next victim. Michael targets Laurie Strode (Jamie Lee Curtis), a young girl who spends her free time babysitting. Throughout the day, Michael stalks Laurie and her friends before striking that night.

This terrifying, largely slash-free masterclass in horror is held at such a high bar for a reason. It doesn’t need excessive gore to be scary, it uses atmosphere and suspense to create fear. The film is somewhat of a slow burner, with Michael waiting until nearly the third act to begin killing. Michael lurks in the background, causing audiences to be on edge waiting for The Shape to make his move, and when he does, it is more than worth it. Halloween (and its immediately iconic ’70s film score) had a major hand in starting a new era of horror and should be seen by anyone who claims to be a fan of the genre.

Taking place immediately after the original on the same night, Halloween II finds Dr. Loomis devastated to learn that six shots to the body weren’t enough to stop Michael Myers. As Laurie is taken to the hospital, Loomis sets out to find Michael, and to discover the reason behind his rampage. Michael learns where Laurie was taken and goes to finish what he started earlier that night. As with any slasher film, this film ups the body count in a far bloodier way. Michael leaves a trail of bodies in his wake and turns the hospital into his own playground. In his research, Loomis discovers the reason Michael has targeted Laurie: she is his sister.

RELATED: These Are The Highest-Grossing Horror Movie Franchise Of All Time

This sibling twist supposedly came from a drunken John Carpenter, and he reportedly hated it; “I think it was, perhaps, a late night fueled by alcoholic beverages, was that idea. A terrible, stupid idea! But that’s what we did,” Carpenter said. He felt that giving Michael a motive ruined his mystery. Still, the fact that Michael and Laurie were siblings would remain canon until 2018.

Michael eventually corners Laurie, and Loomis arrives to stop him at the last moment. Loomis causes an explosion, supposedly killing himself and Michael in the process. This film feels closer to some other generic slashers of the time, but it is still a fun watch. The deaths are much more gruesome and Michael is much deadlier, with more focus on slashes than atmospheric scares.

Halloween H20: 20 Years Later was the first Halloween film to feature Jaime Lee Curtis since 1981 and takes place 20 years after the original massacre. In the years following that deadly night, Laurie Strode moved to California and changed her name in an attempt to escape the trauma caused by her brother. Laurie, now under the name Keri Tate, is the headmistress of a private school and has a son.

Even though Michael Myers seemingly perished in front of her, she is still haunted by his memory. As it turns out her paranoia is warranted, as Michael is alive and has found out where she is. Once again, Laurie must fight for her life as her psychotic brother begins to rack up bodies on his way to end her. Only this time, Laurie isn’t going out without a fight.

This movie was a return to form, and many fans preferred it over the other sequels post-Halloween II. Seeing Jamie Lee Curtis return to the franchise excited fans, and many were satisfied. This film came in the wake of Scream, which changed horror and helped revive slasher films, and Halloween H20 is closer in tone to Scream than it is to Halloween. While it isn’t meta, it still has a new-age feel to it that many agree doesn’t fit in great with Halloween. Even Michael Myers seems to be dumbed-down a bit, as he is treated as a slapstick buffoon in some scenes. Overall, this isn’t a terrible entry. However, this same premise of Laurie having a rematch with Michael would happen once more in another 20 years.

Back to Top

Halloween: Resurrection directly follows H20, and closes the first chapter of Michael and Laurie’s feud. Jamie Lee Curtis was all over the marketing, and fans were anxious to see the two come to blows once more. They were immensely disappointed to see Laurie die in the opening moments. In fact, that is one word many fans used to describe this film: disappointing.

H20 seemed to give Michael Myers a definitive ending. In the closing moments, Laurie decapitated Michael with an ax. This movie retcons that by stating that it wasn’t Michael in H20, but a paramedic wearing his mask. Fans saw this as cheap, and it left a bad taste in their mouths right away. The rest of the film was an attempt to cash in on the already waning popularity of the found footage genre. The plot follows a group of students who take part in a live event. They are to explore the supposedly haunted Myers house as they film their adventure via body cam. The feed is broadcast as a live web show, and the viewers soon learn that Michael is lurking in the house.

A large issue many have is that Resurrection doesn’t fully commit to the found-footage aspect. Some action is shown in a POV camera feed, but a majority is filmed as a normal movie. The movie makes Michael even more silly, by doing things such as having him get Kung-Fu kicked by Busta Rhymes. Outside the opening, this film doesn’t follow the events of the last movie, even though it was marketed as the finale of the Strode/Myers arc. While this technically was true, fans still felt cheated. The film even ends with a jump scare, showing that Michael was still alive. This was the official end of the official timeline. Many fans choose to ignore this entry, meaning that to many H20, was the true finale.

The original series of sequels following Halloween II featured an overarching story featuring Michael’s true origins. This timeline intended to show why exactly Michael was the killing machine he was. Many didn’t like this, as they believed he was scarier when he had no motive. This story arc doubled down on the Myers familial connection, showing that Michael’s true intention was to wipe out his bloodline. These are the sequels the original timeline ignored. The Thorn timeline contains Halloween (1978) and Halloween II (1981) as well as the following movies:

As many fans know, John Carpenter’s original plan for the series after Halloween II was to create an anthology of unrelated movies bearing the Halloween name. The third film was to start this trend, but it was panned (see below). Fans apparently only wanted to see Michael do his thing, so the fourth film gave them what they want.

Halloween 4: The Return of Michael Myers takes place 10 years after that tragic night, and a lot has happened. It is revealed that Laurie had a daughter named Jamie, and died in a car accident sometime before the events of the movie. Michael has been in a comatose state ever since he was set on fire in Halloween II. On the 10-year anniversary, he once again awakens and sets his sights on his niece, Jamie.

RELATED: Best John Carpenter Movies, Ranked

WATCH NOW

DOWNLOAD NOW

Continue Reading

Movie News

How RHONJ Fans Really Feel About Margaret Josephs

Published

on

l intro 1652758947

“RHONJ” fans are divided in their opinions of Margaret Josephs, but on the r/realhousewives subreddit, many agree that she thrives on stirring the pot. Redditor u/Amp5181 wrote: “I’m pretty neutral when it comes to Marge. I dislike her and like her. I think Marge serves a purpose on NJ. She ruffles feathers with her words and gets under Teresa’s skin, and I can appreciate that.

The enduring popularity of the “Real Housewives” franchise can be attributed to many things, including the cast members’ lavish lifestyles, colorful personalities, and off-screen scandals, but most viewers tune in primarily for the drama. The Housewives branded by viewers as troublemakers tend to get more screen time than their less volatile castmates. “It took Marge a few seasons to get there, but she’s figured out if she can keep the rumors running on screen, she will maintain camera time and focus throughout the season without her mess being the subject of conversation,” stated u/mdadashi, who further speculated that as long as it allows her to remain on the reality series, Margaret doesn’t mind being perceived as the heel.

“I’ve said this many times that if these women stayed out of each other’s business, then we wouldn’t have a good show. We need them to use each other,” commented u/Lost-Iron. “Margaret is The bone collector. She delivers the bones,” agreed u/kazz 64. 

WATCH NOW

DOWNLOAD NOW

Continue Reading